2015 National Service Animal Eye Exam

Junebug receiving her 2015 National Service Dog Eye Exam.

Junebug receiving her 2015 National Service Animal Eye Exam.

I am extra waggy happy this morning. Yesterday I had my annual ACVO 2015 National Service Animal Eye Exam and was told that my eyes are looking perfectly healthy, wags wags wags!

My eyes are vital to my successful work as a guide dog for the blind who proudly guides my mom. On our ride over to the appointment, my mom was shaking her foot fast. I pick up on her energy really well. I knew she was feeling nervous and in knowing so, I softly rested my head on her lap. Although my mom felt like I would be given a good report, this was not a 100 % guarantee. That unknown was scary for her. A flood of relief came once we heard, “Your eyes look beautiful,” from the Veterinarian Ophthalmologist. Those words couldn’t have been more welcoming to our ears.

Here is a video collage of my eye exam. My mom said she was so very proud of me. I stayed still for the exam, except for the couple of times I turned my head and gave the assistant a few big Bug kisses. I couldn’t resist!

The ACVO National Service Animal Eye Exam event is a philanthropic effort generously provided to the public by the board certified Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists who donate their time, staff and services to provide free screening ocular exams to qualified Service Animals.

This program would not be successful without the generosity of our Diplomates and the financial support of all our valuable sponsors. 

Over 38,000 Service Animals have received these free screening exams over the past seven years. Please participate, support our ophthalmologists and sponsors to ensure this program continues in 2016 and beyond.”

– Stacee Daniel, ACVO Executive Director

Junebug (left) and her BFF Jules (right) get a Strawberry and Cream dog treat.

Junebug (left) and her BFF Jules (right)  being given a Strawberry and Cream dog treat.

After my eye exam my mom treated Jules, my BFF aka best fur friend furever, and I to a delicious Strawberry and Cream dog treat. This was a treat she had picked up from the local dog bakery. The taste of the smooth strawberry and carob dipped treat delighted my taste buds.

My mom and I are profoundly grateful that my eyes are healthy. We are both very thankful to the ACVO, the Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists, and sponsors who help make such an important event happen.

❤ Wags,

Junebug

Follow Junebug on Social Media

Facebook | Instagram

YouTube | Twitter

Learn more about Junebug’s mom, Margeaux Gray.

Learn more about Junebug’s alumni, Guide Dogs for the Blind.

Advertisements

TO THE MARKET

Jane and Margeaux

Jane Mosbacher Morris, Founder and CEO of TO THE MARKET (left) with Margeaux Gray and Junebug. | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

Margeaux Gray, my mom, survived a traumatic childhood. However, she has not let the trauma define her. Today she is passionate about advocating against the injustice that was done to her. She has come upon many obstacles such as living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and blindness, but sees these simply as hurdles. They may have slowed her down a bit, but she has not let them stop her. She has found a way around. My mom is an advocate, motivational speaker, and artist. Through her voice and art she is educating, empowering, and working to create the change she envisions for the world.

Part of my job as my mom’s guide dog is to guide her to all of her advocacy and speaking engagements. Last Friday I flew with my mom to Washington D.C. The weather was beautiful. The warm blanket of sunshine rested on my fur as I guided her from our hotel to speak at TO THE MARKET‘s “Sip, Shop, and Be Inspired” pop-up event.

TO THE MARKET | Survivor-Made Goods | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

TTM2 TO THE MARKET | Survivor-Made Goods | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

TO THE MARKET, founded by Jane Mosbacher Morris (CEO), is a retailer that sales survivor-made goods crafted by artisans who have lived through abuse, conflict, and disease. Their mission, “combines the powers of commerce and storytelling to empower the world’s most courageous survivor populations, in the belief that resilience is more powerful than suffering.” I definitely recommend that you check the online store out.

My mom is on TO THE MARKET‘s advisory board and I supposed that means by proxy I am as well. Personally, if you ask me, I think I can offer some pretty dog gone good advice. 😉

I am proud of the work my mom is doing. We are a team and I love being her guide dog as well as a co-advocate on her mission to make a difference.

At the event my mom spoke about action and freedom.

Two things my mom stressed in her speech was:

“With thoughtful action, we can all make a difference.”

“Freedom is not black and white. It is a kaleidoscope of different colors, shapes, and sizes.”

The big laugh of the night came when mom was trying on shoes which were being sold at TO THE MARKET‘s pop-up shop. After trying on a few pairs, she went to put back on the shoes she came to the event wearing. Something wasn’t feeling right. After a minute of trying to find her right shoe, she suddenly realized the problem. My mom had worn two different shoes and they were both lefts! How funny is that? Needless to say, we all had a good laugh.

Sometimes, my mom’s blind girl problems ultimately work out in her favor. The Root Collective was their selling shoes and mom left with a beautiful pair Dusty Cayenne Diamond ballet flats.

On our flight home my mom was reflecting on her gratitude for independence. I was comfortably resting my head on her shoes. She told me she loved me and thanked me for giving her another whole level of freedom. She said that liberty can even come in the form of a 62 pound yellow Labrador guide dog named Junebug.

Junebug

Follow Junebug on Social Media

Facebook | Instagram

YouTube | Twitter

Learn more about Junebug’s mom, Margeaux Gray.

Learn more about Junebug’s alumni, Guide Dogs for the Blind.