TO THE MARKET

Jane and Margeaux

Jane Mosbacher Morris, Founder and CEO of TO THE MARKET (left) with Margeaux Gray and Junebug. | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

Margeaux Gray, my mom, survived a traumatic childhood. However, she has not let the trauma define her. Today she is passionate about advocating against the injustice that was done to her. She has come upon many obstacles such as living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and blindness, but sees these simply as hurdles. They may have slowed her down a bit, but she has not let them stop her. She has found a way around. My mom is an advocate, motivational speaker, and artist. Through her voice and art she is educating, empowering, and working to create the change she envisions for the world.

Part of my job as my mom’s guide dog is to guide her to all of her advocacy and speaking engagements. Last Friday I flew with my mom to Washington D.C. The weather was beautiful. The warm blanket of sunshine rested on my fur as I guided her from our hotel to speak at TO THE MARKET‘s “Sip, Shop, and Be Inspired” pop-up event.

TO THE MARKET | Survivor-Made Goods | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

TTM2 TO THE MARKET | Survivor-Made Goods | Photo credit: Chelsea Hudson Photography

TO THE MARKET, founded by Jane Mosbacher Morris (CEO), is a retailer that sales survivor-made goods crafted by artisans who have lived through abuse, conflict, and disease. Their mission, “combines the powers of commerce and storytelling to empower the world’s most courageous survivor populations, in the belief that resilience is more powerful than suffering.” I definitely recommend that you check the online store out.

My mom is on TO THE MARKET‘s advisory board and I supposed that means by proxy I am as well. Personally, if you ask me, I think I can offer some pretty dog gone good advice. 😉

I am proud of the work my mom is doing. We are a team and I love being her guide dog as well as a co-advocate on her mission to make a difference.

At the event my mom spoke about action and freedom.

Two things my mom stressed in her speech was:

“With thoughtful action, we can all make a difference.”

“Freedom is not black and white. It is a kaleidoscope of different colors, shapes, and sizes.”

The big laugh of the night came when mom was trying on shoes which were being sold at TO THE MARKET‘s pop-up shop. After trying on a few pairs, she went to put back on the shoes she came to the event wearing. Something wasn’t feeling right. After a minute of trying to find her right shoe, she suddenly realized the problem. My mom had worn two different shoes and they were both lefts! How funny is that? Needless to say, we all had a good laugh.

Sometimes, my mom’s blind girl problems ultimately work out in her favor. The Root Collective was their selling shoes and mom left with a beautiful pair Dusty Cayenne Diamond ballet flats.

On our flight home my mom was reflecting on her gratitude for independence. I was comfortably resting my head on her shoes. She told me she loved me and thanked me for giving her another whole level of freedom. She said that liberty can even come in the form of a 62 pound yellow Labrador guide dog named Junebug.

Junebug

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Margeaux and Junebug, A Team!

Graduation photo of Margeaux and guide dog Junebug. Guide Dogs for the Blind, March 5, 2011.

Today is a VERY special day. It was four years ago that my mom and I graduated as team from Guide Dogs for the Blind. Cheers! I got a Bug idea that it would be great day for my mom to write a guest blog post.
Enjoy!
❤ Wags,
Junebug
__
 
One day  in my mid twenties I went to check the TV Guide channel, but discovered I couldn’t read it. It was very blurry. Long story short. After seeing different eye doctors and then a specialist, I was diagnosed with bilateral optic neuropathy. It caused my central vision to become impaired.
 
I grieved.
 
I was ignorant as to what the visually impaired could do.
 
Thankfully, I got connected with a rehabilitation center for the blind. I learned to read Braille and was trained in Orientation and Mobility (O&M). I was taught how to use a white cane and navigate the world with low eyesight.
 
I became educated. I befriended lots of different blind and visually impaired people. They became my mentors.
 
I won’t lie, loosing my eyesight was a difficult adjustment. Slowly but surely I adjusted. I became proficient at O&M and my confidence grew.
 
Then one day I started entertaining the idea of getting a guide dog. I did my research and talked with a lot of my friends who were guide dog users. I prayed, slept on it, and listened to my heart. 
 
I was ready!
 
I applied to Guide Dogs for the Blind (GDB). After several phone interviews and a home visit, I got the call that I was accepted.
 
Approximately six months later on Valentine’s Day 2011, I flew out to Guide Dogs San Rafael, CA campus. Three days after arriving it was Dog Day at GDB. This is the day that guide dogs and their partners first meet. It’s a day filled with emotion. I was patiently waiting in my dorm room when I heard the door slowly open. In came a beautiful female yellow Labrador Retriever named Junebug. Her trainer, handed the leash over to me. 
 
I couldn’t help it. I broke down and started crying happy tears.

Junebug guiding Margeaux in downtown San Rafael, CA 2011.

We trained together for three weeks. Junebug came trained, but there were a lot of important things I had to learn as a first time guide dog handler. 

 
Four years ago, on Saturday March 5, 2011, Junebug and I graduated as a team from GDB (see video). At the graduation ceremony I met the couple who raised Junebug. It is a selfless act of kindness what they did and all puppy raisers do. Four years later I keep in regular communication with her raisers. Junebug and I have even visited them twice. They have become like family to me.
 
Mine and Junebug’s journey officially began the day we graduated from Guide Dogs. 
 
Since graduating, Junebug has saved me more than  once from being hit by a car. One time she even saved me from being hit, by of all things, an ambulance. It had not yet turned on its siren. She heard the vehicle coming up from below a parking garage, but I did not. Junebug did just as Guide Dogs for the Blind taught her to do. She stopped guiding me forward and quickly backed me up. Exactly at that time was when the ambulance turned on its siren. It happened so fast. I’ll never forget that day. 
 
Little things can be big. It’s all about perspective. Junebug will find me an empty seat in a crowded waiting room. She can also find me the buttons you push when wanting to cross the street. These little things are huge to me.
 
I’ll never be able to repay her for all she does for me. I do my best to reward her with lots of love, toys, and surprise treats. Her favorite treat is frozen banana and all natural peanut butter.

Top photo: Junebug (right) and Jules (left) in harness. Bottom photo: Junebug (right) and Jules (left) lying down next to one another smiling.

It’s not all work for Junebug. I find it very important to balance work with play time. She has three toy boxes that just keep growing fuller. Her favorite game to play is tug and fetch. She has many other guide dog friends. Her best fur friend is Jules. He is a  male Lab/Golden cross and also is a working guide dog. The two have regular play dates. Just for fun, I’ve taught Junebug twenty-nine neat tricks and counting. She can sure put on a show!

 
Junebug’s name fits perfect with her personality. She is bubbly and outgoing. She loves life and loves attention (when not in harness, of course). She is very compassionate and empathetic.
 
I’m beyond blessed to have her.

Junebug confidently guiding Margeaux down a local city sidewalk.

Today, I am an advocate, motivational speaker, and artist. I realize I may have partially lost my sight, but I have not lost my vision.
 
My mission is to educate, empower, and motivate others.
 
I can’t thank GDB, Junebug’s raisers, her trainer, donors, and all those involved in helping her to become the guide dog she is today.
 
A guide dog puppy named Junebug was raised and my life was PAWsitively changed.
 
Warmly,
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Junebug, the Guide Dog and the Snow

Junebug in harness, standing in the snow.

Have you ever wondered what it looks like when a guide dog works in the snow?

Here’s a video of me yesterday, guiding my mom safely on the snowy sidewalk to her transportation. The video is filmed from mom’s perspective looking down at me.I’m sporting my hot pink winter jacket and am wearing booties.

Aren’t I doing good at work?

You’ll notice that I come to a stop once we get to the intersecting sidewalks. I then wait for mom to tell me which way to go. Yeah, unfortunately guide dogs are not a GPS.

Where we go depends upon the commands our handlers give us (i.e. Junebug left, Junebug right, Junebug halt). It’s a step by step process and the two have to work together. This is why they call a guide dog and their handler a team.

It’s pretty neat, don’t you think?

I love my job and think my mom and I are a PAWesome team!

Junebug standing in the snow with her toy is next to her.

Remember me mentioning in previous blog posts/videos about the importance of balancing guide dog work with play time? Once we got home from mom’s appointment, she took me outside to play in the snow.

It was fun, well sort of. I was raised by two fantastic puppy raisers in Southern California. I definitely prefer the warm sunshine and playing in the Pacific Ocean than the snow, by far any day.

Tomorrow we are supposed to get sub zero temperatures. Brrrr, that’s too cold. It looks like I’ll be California dreaming.

❤ Wags,
Junebug

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Throwback Thursday: Blind Conference, FL

Pascal (black Lab to the far left) and Rica (tiny black Lab to the far right). I’m the yellow Lab in the middle.

Throwback to July 2011. I was two years old and it was just four months into my career as a working guide dog for the blind.

My mom and I had attended a blind conference in Florida.

It was there that I guided mom around thousands of blind people and their white canes. What a challenge! Do you think you could do it if you were a dog? Well, I had a bit of training from my raisers and Guide Dogs for the Blind, so that certainly helped.

It was indeed a challenge, but one that I aced with PAWride!

I met many other working guides there as well including the three featured in the photos here: Pascal (black Lab), Rica (tiny black Lab), and Bambi (now a retired Guiding Eyes for the Blind black Lab).

Guide dogs Pascal (black lab), Rica (black Lab), Bambi (black Lab) and me PAWrtying in the hotel room.

It was so much fun because in the evenings after work we had play dates together. We got to be off harness in the hotel room and and act like the young pups we were. We behaved, but sure had a PAWrty!

Such a fond memory.

💗 Wags,
Junebug

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Junebug Stops at the Grocery

Junebug guiding Margeaux down the grocery store isle. | © 2015

My friends, the other day, at the Trader Joe’s (grocery), I prevented a mass collision of all kinds of dramatic sorts.

Let me explain.

Junebug, stopping for the grocery carts. | © 2015

This past Sunday morning I was guiding my mom into the store. At the same time, a clerk was pushing in a line of stacked back-to-back carts. My mom was oblivious to them. I however, was not. I remembered my training from Guide Dogs for the Blind. I came to a sudden stop when I concluded there would not be enough time for me to guide my mom further forward without us being run down.

My coming to a sudden stop was a que to my mom that we had an obstacle of some kind in our way. She saw with her peripheral vision (her central vision is impaired) a red line and heard the sound of the carts. Mom realized what I had just done for her— that this Bug came to her rescue once again, wags.

The clerk stopped at the same time I did. He was thoroughly impressed with my guide dog skills.

Are you impressed, too?

Junebug guiding Margeaux at the grocery store. | © 2015

After that, I went on to guide my mom to shop for her groceries. We were shopping with a store clerk. My moms visual impairment prevents her from being able to see to read print. I do a lot of things for my mom, but I leave the reading up to her human  assistants. I guided  mom to the stores customer service desk where she requested help shopping. The clerk helped her by reading to her the prices of items, ingredients, and etc.

I listened to my mom as I guided her through the store and she gave me directions to “follow,” “Junebug, left,” and “Junebug, right.” I guided her around poles and other peoples carts. The cool thing is with me as her transportation, unless she sees these things in her peripheral vision, she doesn’t even know they are there. You got it, I guide her right around them. Safely, of course. How cool is that? My mom says it makes for a smooth ride, wags.

My favorite isle at the grocery, paws down, is the dog food/treat/toy isle. I always make a premeditated effort to take a trip down this section.

Lastly I guided my mom to the checkout counter. She used her knowledge of the stores layout and her ears to direct me to the general area. She then gave me the command to “find the checkout.” And, I found it for her, wags!

My mom said she is so grateful and thankful for the extra independence having me as her guide gives her.

This Bug has skills. If I’m guiding and it’s not safe to continue, I’ll stop in the name of love. Admittedly, part of that might be a little self-preservation. 😉

When we got home, mom put up the groceries and proceeded to give me a great big tummy rub. They are the BEST, ever. While she was rubbing my tummy, I couldn’t keep my tail from wagging (see video). I was a proud Bug.

Junebug holds her new stuffing free bunny toy in her mouth.| © 2015

Oh oh oh, and guess what? That evening, my mom bought me a new toy. She bought me a stuffing free bunny rabbit. It’s soft, crinkly, and squeaks. I LOVE it!

Here’s the truth. The truth is, I love my mom. We are one PAWsome team. I love doing a good job and I am proud to be a guide dog for the blind.

Wags,
Junebug

* Note from my mom, Margeaux: Thank you for following my guide dog, Junebug’s adventures. I am an advocate, motivational speaker and artist. I also happen to be partially blind/visually impaired. Please feel free to visit my site margeauxgray.com  If interested in contacting me and or booking me (and Junebug of course, too!) for your event, please click here and fill out the contact form. I will reply to your email in which I’ll attach a speakers request form and an honorarium and travel guidelines document.

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Junebug and the Little Red Tricycle

The little red tricycle by it’s self on the side walk. A second photo of Junebug sitting and posing beside it. © 2014

Happy New Year my friends! Yesterday was a beautiful (albeit cold) winter day here in Kentucky. The sun was shining which always makes me extra waggly. It was a cool 25° F (feels like 19° F) which is about -4º C (feels like -7º C) outside. The frigid weather did not keep me from working.

Yesterday morning I guided mom to an appointment. After that, I guided her on a walk. I had the good fast pace that she likes going and then I came to an abrupt stop. I was telling her to explore because there was an obstacle on the sidewalk. You know what I did? I kept her from walking into or tripping over a child’s tricycle (see photo), wags. I was so very proud of myself and mom was so very proud of me. She praised me and gave me kisses on my forehead. You see that’s something she quite possibly could trip and hurt herself over — that is however, if she did not have me or was walking without a white cane or assistance. I was trained by my alumni, Guide Dogs for the Blind how to handle situations like that one. I was trained how to alert my handler (my mom) when an obstacle on our path is in the way. After mom finished praising me, she had a light bulb moment — she thought what a great opportunity it would be to record such an encounter and to share with all of you. She thought it would be an educational moment, to give you a little glimpse into what a Guide Dog like myself can do for the blind and visually impaired. Then she realized, it was also a great reminder to be appreciative of what we may perceive as “the little things in life.” Are they really small? For my mom, what some may see as a little red tricycle on the sidewalk is a reminder of how grateful and blessed she is to have me as her Guide Dog. For  her I am a freedom. So, do you know what she did? She made a video! She had me back up and rework the scene as she recorded it on her phone. And, then I came home and wrote this blog post. How PAWesome is that?

Junebug enjoying her Kong Extreme toy filled with a few pieces of frozen banana and peanut butter. © 2014

Junebog and her Kong  ExtremeJunebog and her Kong  ExtremeTrader Joe's Peanut Butter Junebug enjoying her Kong Extreme toy filled with a few pieces of frozen banana and Trader Joe’s unsalted peanut butter. © 2014

You know what also is PAWesome? When I guided her back home, she rewarded me with a woofderful Kong Company Extreme toy filled with a few pieces of frozen banana and Trader Joe’s creamy unsalted peanut butter (from unbleached peanuts). Wags wags wags, it was so delicious. Mom said it was also well deserved. She said I’ve done another whole year of doing an excellent job of guiding her. She handed me the Kong Extreme filled treat and said, “Cheers, to you Junebug!”

Alright, are you ready to watch the video? Don’t be disappointed if you’re blind or visually impaired. Mom made a point to describe what was happening. If you are hearing impaired, there are subtitles. So, without further ado, I present to you my first video published on my new YouTube channel:

Enjoy and let me know what you think. If you like what you see, keep following my blog and invite your family and friends to do so as well. I’m a social Bug — so be sure to follow me on social media. Have a Happy New Year!

Wags,

Junebug

* Note from my mom, Margeaux: Thank you for watching this video. I am an advocate, motivational speaker and artist. I also happen to be partially blind/visually impaired. Please feel free to visit my site margeauxgray.com. If interested in contacting me and or booking me (and Junebug of course, too!) for your event, please click here and fill out the contact form.

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